LitSalon


About

The London Literary Salon was founded by Toby Brothers. The Salons offer discussion-based study of how works of great literature reflect the rich complexity of human experience. Courses range from one intensive meeting to  6 month studies. They provide a lively forum for exchanging and exploring ideas and meaning, a meeting of minds, a place to share diverse opinions.


On offer are  great authors such as Homer, Virgil, Dante, Shakespeare, James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf and several 20th and 21st century accomplished short story writers.

Suggestions for further studies are always welcome.

Upcoming Courses

   THE NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE: FOUR PRIZEWINNERS ALICE MUNRO, WILLIAM FAULKNER, W.B.YEATS, BOB DYLAN  

Location: Waterstones Piccadilly 3rd Floor 

Duration: four fortnightly sessions from 6.30 pm to 8.30 pm. 

Tuesday 2 May:   Alice Munro “Chance” from “Runaway” 

Tuesday 16 May: William Faulkner “Dry September” 

Tuesday 30 May: W.B. Yeats Selected Poems 

Tuesday 6 June: The lyrics of Bob Dylan selected from “Bringing it all back home”, “Highway 61 revisited”, “Blonde on Blonde” 

Price: £25 per session, £90 for 4 sessions, payable via PayPal to carolmartinsperry@gmail.com  

  The Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded annually by the Swedish Academy to an author who has produced "in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction". "Work" refers to an author's work as a whole. 

As the world's most prestigious literature prize, it often carries political significance. 

I have chosen a selection from four very different authors whose works were deemed worthy of the Nobel Prize. They have all been prolific with long-lasting careers as writers and offer examples of the wide range of writing that has been considered great. 

What is it in their work that stands out? Do we think they are worthy of the Prize? How do we define literature? 

What they share in common is their acute observation of the breadth and depth of human experience, expressed in different forms and what we share as readers is our emotional and psychological response to their work, both in form and content.